Monthly Archives: February 2015

CSC Webinars on Cyber Security and Big Data

CSC (Computer Sciences Corporation) is hosting two FREE webinars on the topics of cyber security and Big Data. For those unfamiliar with CSC, the corporation is one of the biggest IT companies in the world. They employ over 72,000 people in over 70 countries across the world and currently have main offices located in Sweden, Denmark, and Norway.

The first online seminar is on Tuesday, March 10th, from 6-7 PM. The presenter of the seminar is Robert J. Carey. Mr. Carey worked for the Department of Defense for over 31 years and recently retired in March, 2014. Mr. Carey championed the ideas of enterprise computing, improved military mobile solutions, and  advanced cyber security while working for the United States Navy. He currently holds the position of Vice President of Cyber Security at Computer Sciences Corporation.

The second online seminar offered is on Thursday, March 26th, from 6-7 PM. The presenter of this seminar is Hank Tseu. Mr. Tseu is the director and general manager of 42six. 42six develops big data and mobility software for CSC’s North American public sector. Mr. Tseu has over 15 years in the field applying cutting edge technology in mission critical environments in the areospace and defense industry.

To register for either (or both) webinars, simply click on the following link and fill in the following information:

  • Name
  • Email address
  • University currently attending/attended
  • Graduation year

Click Here to Register!

“Sit With Me” Women in Information Technology Reception on March 2

What:  Kick-off Reception to celebrate Women’s History Month
When: Monday, March 2, 2015 from 5:30-7:00pm
Where: Sewall Center Arena

Why: Encouraging female participation in Information Technology in participation with sitwithme.org and collaboration with the National Center for Women in Information Technology

Sit With Me invites you to validate and recognize the important role women play in creating future technology by taking a small but symbolic action: sit in a red chair and share your story. Pull up a chair and listen to stories from others; men, women, technical and non-technical, as they sit in the red chair (sitwithme.org).

Guests are welcome to attend the RMU women’s basketball game vs. Wagner College following the event.  Freedom Card holders receive free admission.  Complimentary tickets are available for off campus guests.

PLEASE RSVP BY FEBRUARY 27 BY CLICKING HERE.

*For additional Information regarding this reception, please contact the office of student life at (412) 397-6489.

It’s Business Week at RMU, and you’re Invited!

This week at RMU is Business Week.  Many of the companies coming to campus are looking for IT-related majors as well as business majors, so this is a great networking opportunity in addition to the opportunity to attend several interesting panel discussions.  All RMU students are welcome and encouraged to attend these events.

Panel: SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST- Don’t be Eaten Alive! Surviving and Thriving in the Workplace Jungle
Tuesday, February 24, 1:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. – Sewall Center – Dining Room

Topics will include but not be limited to:

  • What to expect on day 1/week1- how to deal with being overwhelmed at a new job/internship & what to expect
  • Now that you’ve landed the job, what are the do’s and don’ts of office culture- Tips on how to ask for manager feedback, how to deal with ambiguity and problems that arise, how to stand out in your role, etc.
  • Advice to millennials on how to deal with non-millennials
  • Leadership in the workplace; also, the concept of value-added; how to stand out
  • Other advice to young professionals regarding navigating the workplace: dealing with office politics, advancing in the workplace and/or knowing when to leave an organization and how to do it, etc.

    Panelists:
    Tom Farmar, PHR, Regional HR Manager, Advance Auto Parts
    Steve Kobert (RMU Finance 2010), Advisory Staff, EY
    Angela Naderi-Blezard (RMU M.B.A. 2009), Retail Marketing Manager, Highmark
    Dave Rea, Project Manager, Catalyst Connection
    Kristie Tamski (tentative) (RMU Marketing 2008), Senior Digital Account Executive, PMI

PANEL: BEING A CHAMELEON: Adapting to the Recruiter for Interview Success – Selling Yourself in the Interview
Tuesday, February 24, 3:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. – Sewall Center – International Suite

Topics will include but not be limited to:

  • Emotional Intelligence (EQ) (how to use EQ to excel in an interview and in the workplace)
  • Do’s and don’ts of the interview; also, the subtle issues that make you stand out or get rejected
  • Advice on how to answer the toughest and strangest interview questions
  • Advice on phone and Skype interviews
  • Beyond the basics: second interviews, panel interviews, etc.
  • Testing (what types, suggestions for taking)
  • Importance of follow-up: how and why

    Panelists:
    Erin Baker, VP of Line of Business Development Programs and Campus Recruiting, PNC
    Tom Farmar, PHR, Regional HR Manager, Advance Auto Parts
    Dave Rea, Project Manager, Catalyst Connection
    Kristie Tamski (tentative) (RMU Marketing 2008), Senior Digital Account Executive, PMI
    Kelly Welde, Campus Recruiter, PNC

PANEL: NO TIME FOR MONKEY BUSINESS: A Crash Course in Excel
Wednesday, February 25, 4:40 p.m. – 5:50 p.m. – Sewall Center – Dining Room

Description:
Learning short cuts and quick tricks in Excel provides a HUGE benefit when in an internship or first job. Plus, it’s a good way to impress (and help) your manager once on the job! This session will provide tips from a recent graduate & a student intern.

Presenters:
Keegan Beemsterboer, Tax Associate, KPMG LLP
Vanessa Petrasko, (RMU Economics/Finance 2015/ Integrated MBA 2016), former Dell Intern

PANEL:  THE INTERNSHIP SAFARI: Exploring the Professional Jungles through Internships
Thursday, February 26, 9:15 – 10:30 a.m.- Sewall Center – Dining Room

Description:
This session will include a discussion on:

  • The importance of internships, whether or not they are for academic credit
  • What employers look for in selecting candidates
  • A student’s perspective on the value of interning and the internship search
  • When, how and where to look for internships
  • Details on the Academic Internship Program

    Panelists:
    Celine Stanasolovich, Director of Accounting & Human Resources, Legend Financial Advisors, Inc.
    Ashley Stark, Campus Relations Associate Recruiter, BNY Mellon
    Vanessa Petrasko, Student Intern
    Sheila Broman, Internship Coordinator, RMU
    Carole Weldon, Career Counselor for School of Business students, RMU

An Idea for Predicting Future Technologies

Student Editorial

So you want to be the next Steve Jobs, eh? You want to see the future before it happens? You want the ability to determine which ideas will be embraced by the world? Then you must pay close attention to the way things are going, and find the places where the flow is being blocked, or dammed up. Those are the points where new streams are waiting to be formed.

Successful technologies solve problems. Using a flowing stream as an analogy, the water is the public, the people who say, “this product solves my problem, I’m going to buy it.” The current is the way the public is going, the technologies they’re using, and the things they’re doing. Dams in the stream are the problems. They’re causing problems for the people. If you can identify the dams, you’ve taken a big leap in predicting future technologies.

What is the solution to a dam? If you guessed a new stream, you’re right. Most great technologies, if not all, solve problems or improve upon solutions by creating new ways of doing the same thing. Smart phones are a new way of communicating, the wheel was a new way of moving heavy things, sliced bread was a new way of selling the same old bread. All of these new ways simply changed the old ways, usually for the better.

Identify The Dams

Great innovators like Steve Jobs, Thomas Edison, and Bill Gates don’t necessarily solve problems. They have teams of people to do that for them. What they do is find the places in the stream that are dammed up. They predict which future technologies will be embraced by consumers.

The most important thing is finding the problems. If you can find where people are having problems, you’ve won a major battle. Here are a couple examples.

Example #1: New Yorkers

Every day, the New York City subway system is packed with people – much like a can of sardines, maybe a little stinkier. Most of the people are on their way to work. Before tablet computing, the subway people made their commute bearable by reading the New York Times. Tons of people standing shoulder to shoulder reading newspapers, can you see the problem (the dam)? Well, people got pretty smart and began folding their newspapers into little rectangles, approximately the size of an iPad. Of course, this was before the iPad existed.

So, you can see the water was really built up at the dam. It was built up so much that a make-shift solution (stream) had formed. There was an art to folding one’s New York Times just right so that the pages could be turned without disrupting everyone else on the tightly packed train. That’s not a great solution, but it is a solution that showed how badly the water was dammed up. Well, Apple made a new stream when they created the iPad, and the water poured.

Example #2: Teenage Girls in Love

There’s a great song from the pre-Skype era called “Four” by a killer 90s pop punk band named Lit. In that song, there is one very important line – important to this example anyway – it goes, “she hangs our picture by the phone.” Notice the water building up at the dam? You can tell it’s almost overflowing by the make-shift solution the girl has made. The problem, the dam itself, is described perfectly in the chorus of the song, “she doesn’t think we’re gonna make it.” The singer and his girlfriend are having trouble with their relationship, and the fact that they are apart so much is to blame. As a make-shift solution to the problem of not seeing her boyfriend enough, the girlfriend hangs a picture of them by the phone, so she can picture him when they talk.

Someone could have heard this song, and identified the problem, and they would have been able to predict a future technology. It’s almost like video chat was invented by a teenage girl in love. Except, it wasn’t quite as good as video chat. So, when video chat came along, there was plenty of backed up water to flow down the stream, and the companies that built the stream – Skype, Oovoo, Google Hangouts – saw plenty of success.

Where the Dam is About to Flood

So, obviously great technologies solve problems. That’s easy. The trickier part is figuring out which problem is so bad that tons of people will pay for the solution; figuring out where the water is about to spill over the dam. If you can figure out the big problem, you’re more than half way there. You can predict future technologies, future tools. Then all that’s left is solving the problem, or coming up with a better solution, and that is why we go to Robert Morris University!

Resume Tips for Students Seeking IT Security Jobs or Internships

On February 6, 2015, the Top Secret Colonials sponsored an IT Resume Writing Lecture.  This lecture was given by Al Wong of The MITRE Corporation.  The talk featured specific tips related to resume writing and interviewing for IT Security positions.  If you are planning to be in the job market for a security-related position, take a few minutes to review the slides from this lecture:

Resumes That Get You in the Door (PDF)

Sponsored by The Top Secret Colonials